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Home Geography for Primary Grades - Book
Home Geography for Primary Grades - Book

Home Geography for Primary Grades

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Home Geography by C. C. Long is a delightful introduction to the geography of home — one's own place in the world. Each short lesson is illustrated with a charming drawing, and many simple, practical activities illustrate the principles covered.

The author begins with advice to the teacher:



Geography may be divided into the geography of the home and the geography of the world at large. A knowledge of the home must be obtained by direct observation; of the rest of the world, through the imagination assisted by information. Ideas acquired by direct observation form a basis for imagining those things which are distant and unknown.



Why study home geography first?




The first work, then, in geographical instruction, is to study that small part of the earth's surface lying just at our doors. All around are illustrations of lake and river, upland and lowland, slope and valley. These forms must be actually observed by the pupil, mental pictures obtained, in order that he may be enabled to build up in his mind other mental pictures of similar unseen forms. The hill that he climbs each day may, by an appeal to his imagination, represent to him the lofty Andes or the Alps. From the meadow, or the bit of level land near the door, may be developed a notion of plain and prairie. The little stream that flows past the schoolhouse door, or even one formed by the sudden shower, may speak to him of the Mississippi, the Amazon, or the Rhine. Similarly, the idea of sea or ocean may be deduced from that of pond or lake. Thus, after the pupil has acquired elementary ideas by actual perception, the imagination can use them in constructing, on a larger scale, mental pictures of similar objects outside the bounds of his own experience and observation.


This is followed by excellent general instructions for teaching geography both delightfully and effectively. Much of the advice is applicable to other subjects as well, and is completely compatible with classic Charlotte Mason methods.